An Interview with the Cloud: Current trends, Cloud adoption, Design planning, and BYOD

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An Interview with the Cloud: Current trends, Cloud adoption, Design planning, and BYOD

Over the past few years, cloud computing has jumped into many meeting rooms all over the world. The conversation was similar: This technology is here. It’s said to be great. Now how do we use it?

While there are still some remaining questions there are some important things to note. Cloud computing has been around for a while – rather – the technology has been. Transferring data through the WAN, or Internet, is nothing new. These tools have been widely adopted since the delivery of a modem to the end-user.  With advancements in hardware and bandwidth capabilities, the ability to transfer more data at faster rates became a reality. Now, organizations can really align some of their business goals while using the cloud. Nevertheless, there are still some considerations around this technology.

Joining us today for a rare interview on cloud architecture and current trends, is The Cloud.

BK: Thank you so much for joining us today Cloud.

Cloud: It’s a pleasure to be here, Bill.

BK: Well, let’s get right into it. Your ads are everywhere – airports, bus stations, TV… With this influx of activity how are you seeing corporate users adopt your technology?

Cloud: Great question. Initially, there was a lot of confusion around what I was capable of doing. Now that much of that has cleared up, many organizations are looking to me for some really specific projects.

BK: Can you elaborate?

Cloud: Of course. There is a general misconception where IT professionals feel like my hybrid, public, and private and now community model is better than the other. The truth is that each has a very specific business case. Organizations looking to speed up their application testing and development cycle have looked to me for fast provisioning and de-provisioning of public cloud resources. Other companies are looking to my private model to delivery applications, desktops and data to all authenticated users located anywhere, anytime, and on virtually any device.

BK: I believe there is a term for that?

Cloud: Yes, it’s the generation of data-on-demand. There is direct need for data to be available all the time. Even more so, is the need for that data to be backed up and made redundant. These are very real demands being made by today’s large organizations.

BK: Sounds like it’s a bit more than just going out to a partner and saying “sign me up to the cloud.” How should administrators be planning their data centers to be ready for you?

Cloud: Ah, yes – having a good core infrastructure will mean a successful cloud deployment. Remember, each scenario is different, but it’s very important to plan thoroughly. For example, if your organization is deploying massive amounts of virtual desktop images over the WAN – it’s important to have proper IOPS metrics, the right amount of bandwidth (both WAN and LAN) and a server environment capable of handling the resources and load.

BK: Now that you mention planning, BYOD is an initiative on many project lists. I’ve heard mixed things about going to a BYOD-like scenario. Are there really many challenges with delivering workloads to an end-user owned device?

Cloud: BYOD is the result of my expansion and IT consumerization. Many end-users began bringing their own devices into an organization and wanted to get corporate data pushed down to that device. Well, using private cloud technologies – we’re able to not only deliver applications and data – we can push down entire virtual desktops. So, users are able to bring in their own laptops or mobile devices and continue to work off of those. Now, with better security measures, that corporate data is secured.

BK: Have you seen any best practices or concerns when moving towards BYOD?

Cloud: Yes – under no circumstances should your organization make BYOD synonymous with a device free-for-all. There should be device compatibility as well as usage policies built directly around BYOD. It should be made clear that the hardware is the responsibility of the end-user. Furthermore, end-point analysis can help with user devices which are not well secured.  Other organizations have even implemented stipend programs. Instead of buying new hardware internally and maintaining it, a company will give a user $2500 for a new device listed on a compatibility list.

BK: Well, that’s all the time we have for today. I want to thank our special guest, Cloud, for joining us and providing some great insight! For our readers and fellow commentators – what are some of the biggest challenges you’re seeing when it comes to cloud adoption?

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